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Hundred Dresses 4th Grade Class help! please! :-) [30 Sep 2013|02:20pm]

libsrevenge
Hey Awesome Librarians!

I am visiting a 4th grade class tomorrow and the teacher would like for me to work about 30 minutes with the kids on something based about the book Hundred Dresses by Estes. Normally, I consider myself a very intelligent and creative individual, however, it is tomorrow and the teacher just called and left a message today. (After having me call them consistently for a week and receiving no answer) Any ideas would be vastly appreciated! Thanks!

I have just thought of another idea...Does anyone have some really fun activities about bullying? I have some wonderful things about bullying and discussion topics for it but I'm looking for two or three activities. So far I have a kind of Simon Says game...Simon says everyone with brown eyes hop on one foot etc.
5 comments|post comment

Drew Library's Methodist Center Digitization Project Tops 3,000 Images [12 Jul 2013|09:55am]

bunnyjadwiga
Originally posted by bunnyjadwiga at Drew Library's Methodist Center Digitization Project Tops 3,000 Images
http://www.drew.edu/library/?p=7101
What do 3,000 old-time Methodists look like in one place? The Drew Library’s Flickr feed!

The staff of the Drew University Methodist Library has been digitizing several thousand folders of archived images to Flickr. The images date from the 18th century to the present and include a variety of persons affiliated with the global Methodist tradition. Pictures include educators, missionaries, ministers, and social justice advocates. Most of the images highlight individuals from the United Methodist Church tradition but many evidence individuals from lesser known Methodist-related denominations.

Scholars, teachers, and students looking for images to compliment their books, classroom presentations, or course papers will find the images useful as visual representations from history. The images can be viewed at the website link below and high resolution copies are available by contacting the staff of the United Methodist Archives and History Center. If you have questions concerning the project please contact Chris Anderson at cjanders@drew.edu.

Link to project:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/drewulibrary/sets/72157632280261950/with/8293443823/
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Kansas City's Wrestlin' Librarian [03 Mar 2013|08:52pm]

deathstar461
Profile in a local paper, about the librarian by day, ameture wrestler by night- good read!

http://www.inkkc.com/content/his-title-isnt-on-the-library-shelf/
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Can I do this easily? Kindle books [21 Jan 2013|01:34pm]

beadylady
I would like to get a list of all the Pennsylvania libraries that allow in-state residents to borrow ebooks through their library. I already know about the Free LIbrary of Philadelphia...How do I find out if there are others?

Thank you!
2 comments|post comment

Applying for Librarian Positions [17 Jul 2012|04:28pm]

amycooper
I emerge from a pile of job applications to share with you some tips on applying for librarian jobs. Advice to job seekers from a member of a search committeeCollapse )
8 comments|post comment

Percentage currently checked out? [17 Jul 2012|12:08pm]

jonaskaite
Statistics whee!

I'm putting together some statistics for our Board of Trustees - begging for money to buy shelves, basically. One of the questions I'm running up against, and unable to answer, is: how much of the collection should actually be checked out at any given time? I'm talking snapshot, not turnover.

I can find this information for academic libraries, and I'm finding some really interesting chatter about crazy-high numbers at highly specialized and experimental suburban branch libraries (hey, Lone Tree!) but I can't find a realistic, typical best practice for small (under-10,000-pop, under-50,000-volume), nonspecialized, single-site public libraries.

Does anybody have a guideline for small publics? A source to point to would be GREAT, but anecdotal data is awesome too. Thanks!
4 comments|post comment

Library science degrees abroad? [10 Jul 2012|09:28am]

jaxadora
[ mood | curious ]

So, I have a question which I've been searching on Google for the answer to no avail.

I'm looking into getting my MLIS degree in the next year or two. Originally my plan was to do the online courses from University of Pittsburgh but now my mind has been wandering. Would it be possible for me to get a library science degree in the UK and come back to the U.S. to obtain a librarian job? I simply have no idea if jobs will accept an MLS (or MLIS) if it's from another country. I'm sure it's not impossible, but I thought I'd ask anyways!

Also, any insight you have to share on applying for a library science degree abroad would be great. :)

11 comments|post comment

Interview Help! :-) For Manager Position [05 Jul 2012|01:44pm]

libsrevenge
[ mood | nervous ]

Hello,

If anyone could give me some great advice about interviewing for a management position, I would be greatly appreciative. :-)

I have been working at a branch library with my district for four years and they are interviewing for a beginning management position in a branch. Does anyone know what kind of questions will be asked? I'm really nervous and am not sure what I should prepare for. :-)


Thanks Bunches!

6 comments|post comment

a question on library directors [15 Jun 2012|05:41pm]

beadylady
[ mood | confused ]

Hello: I saw an ad today for a library director. The requirements read, in part:
Bachelor's Degree with a Library Assistant Certificate or 9 credits in Library Science, or a willingness to obtain the desired credentials within a set time period.​ The successful candidate would have library or related business experience, management and interpersonal skills, computer skills, criminal background check, and be service oriented.​

Recently, I began volunteering at a local public library. The director there (who has both an MLS and a Ph.D., though the doctorate is not related to LIS), asked me if I had a BA (which I do). She mentioned some director's jobs would be opening up in our public system soon and that I might want to consider applying.

Also, a good friend of mine (who recently earned her MLS) has been working as a branch director for several years now. She started out as a circulation assistant, and a few months later voila, she was director of a branch. She has the same BA as I do, but managed a bookstore.

Can anyone clue me in on how someone can be a library director w/o an MLS? Why would an MLS NOT be required? This just seems odd to me.
Thanks!

11 comments|post comment

Making a portfolio. [12 Mar 2012|11:17am]

auraseer11
[ mood | hopeful ]

Hello everyone.

I am one of two librarians assigned to a very large elementary school. Due to budgetary reasons, I will probably not be at that school next year. While this is disappointing, I can accept this.

To prepare for my possible upcoming job search, I am making a portfolio of the work that I have done at the school. This will include screen shots of the websites and programs that I have demonstrated to the students, copies of the library homework that I had created, and a few photocopied pages of the book that the students had made under my supervision.

I would like to include a recording of me reading to the students; but am not sure how I can include this. Should I use a tape? Record it on a USB stick? Record it on a website and direct people to a URL? (If posting a reading online is the best option, there will be copyright issues.)

Any advice on how I should record the reading, and anything else I should put in the portfolio, would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

3 comments|post comment

ResourceMate in a small public school? [19 Jan 2012|04:50pm]

jonaskaite
[ mood | curious ]

I'm doing some research to help out my local school district, who had a catastrophic server failure and lost their ILS server and all backups over the winter holidays. They had been running the ancient Follett Circulation Plus package and are looking to start over, entirely from scratch, on something else. They've got a collection of 12-15k (we're not actually sure because the ILS is up in smoke!) at three sites.

We're hesitant to suggest an open-source package because, well, their IT people really aren't. They're looking at Insignia, which we're running at the public library here, but it's a little out of their price range (and, hey, if Insignia's too expensive, there's not a whole lot of other choices out there).

Somewhere they came up with ResourceMate as a possibility, and it looks like it might be perfect for them. Perfect enough to make me wary, because who sells an ILS for under a thousand dollars?

Does anybody have any experience with this package? Is it suitable for a public school setting?

14 comments|post comment

[21 Dec 2011|06:43pm]

hedr
I'm a children's librarian at a small branch in a large urban public library system. I've had issues for months battling the rest of the staff's negativity toward children and young adults. I've already made significant progress, but I've hit a road block. I *know* there has to be professional literature out there somewhere about ways to be welcoming to children and young adults. I've been scouring ala.org and looking in databases and such, and I'm sure I'll be able to find things if I keep looking -- but do you have any favorite resources on this topic? (I can find plenty of blog posts about "no shushing" and things like that. I want something that looks "official" so that I can show them to these people who have no clue.)

Also, how do you feel about the following "rules" in the library? Does your opinion differ for the children's room compared to the adult room? (I'm definitely not saying that I don't think *any* of these rules should be followed. I just want to see if there's any general consensus about these types of things.)

-NO cell phones in the library.
-NO chewing gum in the library.
-NO food or drink in the library.
-NO hanging out in the library. (You must be reading, using a computer, or using the library's resources in some other way.)
-NO checking out books or using the computers unless you have your library card with you. Even if you have picture ID.
-NO using the computers more than once a day. Even if there's no one waiting.

Input would be much appreciated, especially from children's librarians in public libraries.
27 comments|post comment

Recently weeded? [28 Nov 2011|03:38pm]

jonaskaite
Background: bootstrapped, self-taught collection manager in a small rural public. I know a lot of what works, but not a lot about the correct way to do things or how they are done in bigger systems, and sometimes I don't realize we have a problem until it smacks me in the face.

A volunteer who's sorting donations just brought me a book that we don't have and asked if he should add it to the "tentatively keep" pile - and I realized that it was the very same book I'd weeded LAST WEEK. It's not the first time I've looked at a donation and thought, "I'm sure we used to have that, but evidently we don't anymore. Hrm." Which makes me wonder if previously-weeded items do get added back in... and if we should do anything about it. Seems like a lot of staff labor wasted.

Do you keep track of titles recently weeded? For how long? What's the procedure? The first thing that comes to mind is just to run off a "titles to be destroyed" report before hitting the big red button on each weed batch, and then either 1.) physically filing those reports by classification category or 2.) merge them into one giant master spreadsheet by classification and date and then periodically purge entries before $-x date. Also seems like a lot of staff labor wasted on... things we got rid of because we don't want to waste our resources on them anymore.

It's a dilemma!
9 comments|post comment

What is a good way to display your new display books when you've many pending ones ? [09 Nov 2011|10:57pm]

flealancer
What is a good way to display your new display books when you've many pending ones ?
Currently, the library I'm working can display about 30 books on the new books display shelves.
The problem is the library still have about 100 - 120 books pending from "backlog" which are still not displayed on the new books display shelves. 
It can be tough to replace all the 30 books per week since certain times, new book arrivals do not come on certain weeks or the number of books are very minimal. 
Additionally, the new display books shelves needs to be fully occupied (must display 30 books) and must never be empty, unless a library patron has borrowed it so we can see that the specific book has been borrowed.
Can someone share with me their experiences in handling such scenarios and/or how your library handles new book displays. 
If you have photos of your library displays, please post it here.

Thanks.
4 comments|post comment

Public Library Blogs [15 Oct 2011|12:33pm]

toastedcheese
Does anyone have any recommendations for blogs about public librarianship? I graduated with my MLS in May and am looking to stay engaged and current in the profession while I search for my first professional job.
9 comments|post comment

Hm, should I go to the library? [14 Oct 2011|11:33am]

je_reviens
OMG I LOVE THIS SO MUCH!!!


Should I Go the Fuck to the Library?
4 comments|post comment

[07 Oct 2011|08:22am]

lostarkeo
Hello!

I recently became a Reference and Instruction Librarian for a small (very small) academic library. I have under my supervision three work study students. The director allows them to do homework when library projects are low. However, they don't take advantage of that time and instead I find them socializing. They're definitely not getting paid to socialize. 

Since I've never had to supervise work study students before I was wondering if anyone had ideas for library projects. Keep in mind that this is a small library.

I thought of shelf reading, but that will literally last them a few days. Any thoughts? Much appreciated if anything comes my way!
10 comments|post comment

What are popular online forums where library professionals around the world can meet and discuss ? [28 Sep 2011|09:06pm]

flealancer
What are popular online forums where library professionals around the world can meet and discuss ?
Like it's meant for library professionals only.
Allow discussion on the new developments or interior design of a library in a country.
I'd like to know, do you know ?  
1 comment|post comment

Just a little funny to brighten up the day [23 Aug 2011|10:54am]

rurounitriv
Seen at the Hillsdale Free Public Library via the WIN! Blog:



http://wins.failblog.org/2011/08/04/epic-win-photos-cant-deny-win/
2 comments|post comment

What people don't know [18 Aug 2011|09:37am]

je_reviens
This is pretty interesting. Tell me what people don't know about your job. Comments are cool.

I like all the librarians who commented!

But also enjoy learning about other peoples' jobs, like security guard and bass player.
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